Posted on

Mixing Soap Dough Colors

Rainbow Sorcery Soap Cookies

On occasion I receive messages asking how to mix soap dough colors.

Ideally it is preferable to make the soap dough with the color mixed into the oils before lye-water is added. I use soap stable micas; some from TKB Trading, Nurture Soap Supply and a few other places.

Read about more about soap dough and how to mix colors here: “An Enchanted Book of Peculiar Ideas and Soap Potions.” 

First try making the basic colors, or primary colors – red, blue and yellow. With these prime colors the secondary and tertiary colors can be made. Having white soap dough will give tints of any of these colors.

Here is a video sharing when soap dough has not been made properly and what it looks like when it has been made properly.

If you would like to use my recipe here is pre-made Sorcery Soap dough with all the magic that can be packaged into each bar.

Posted on

Experiment Challenge for You

Holiday Soap Buttons

I have an experiment for you or call it a challenge. I challenge you to make presentable cold process soap in a week.  Think it’s impossible?

The next time you make your normal cold process soap cut a slice off and leave it. Just leave and count the days until you feel you can use it. I should take about a week.

When you use it, does it bubble? Is it hard? The thicker the soap cookie the longer it will take to cure, but the thinner it is, the shorter the time.

Now, the next time you are under a deadline for a gift, or a time crunch, make a soap cookie.

Use a cookie cutter and push it into that slice of soap. Do it a few times and you have many gifts. (Embellishments are a bonus, like decorating a great tasting cookie.)

If you take this a bit further and prepare to make soap cookies by making soap dough you will have many soap cookies, just like a batch of cookies.

This is a quick way to share cold process soap with friends and family that collapses those 4-6 weeks of normal cure time for a bar of soap.

If you want to see more ways to make soap cookies, take a look at this video and others I’ve made.

Posted on

Quick Tips for Soap Molding

Sorcery Soap Pink Grapefruit - Forbidden Fruit

Moldable Soap

Recently someone wrote to me asking how to stop soap from sticking in a cookie cutter.Sorcery Soap Pink Grapefruit - Forbidden Fruit

That is a great question. More questions answered about Soap Dough and the process in “An Enchanted Book of Peculiar Ideas and Soap Potions” . Read it today!

For this situation we will employ magic. Not ancient magic, like our ancestors, but common mis-understood magic. The magic I am referring to is tenacity.

Tenacity is tricky, but to say that we overcome hitches in our giddiy-ups without it is to underestimate the power of tenacity. Staying with anything, even when it gets sticky (ah…) is to see doors that were not previously seen, let-alone, understood. These doorways open up to new worlds of imagination and creativity.

No matter the level of tenacity, some quick tips are always helpful.

Don’t over complicate this process.

1.) Use a reliable and predictable soap recipe and cover it with plastic. Air exposure will harden soap. To keep it pliable seal the soap against air exposure.

2.) Cornstarch dusting is helpful to avoid soap sticking.

3.) Soap can be touched with bare hands after 24-48 hours of full saponification. Zap-test or pH test soap if you are unsure.

4.) Let your imagination out of the box and start creating!

Simple Soap Recipe

Author: Bee Iyata
Recipe type: Cold Process Soap Dough 
A simple soap recipe for your rotation, to build on, or a good go-to. An ideal soap recipe for cold process hand molding soap.
Ingredients
  • Lard – 50%
  • Coconut Oil – 30%
  • Olive Oil – 20%
  • *Olive oil can be substituted with soybean oil.
Instructions – Follow your own safe handling of Sodium Hydroxide.
  1. Melt the lard and coconut oil in microwave or double boiler to incorporate these ingredients.
  2. Add your liquid soybean oil (or other liquid oil) to the heated mixture. This will help cool the oils.
  3. Add lye water to your oils, not the other way around (please read lye safety section in “An Enchanted Book of Peculiar Ideas and Soap Potions” on how to handle lye).
  4. Stick blend your oils and lye until trace.
  5. Add colorants.
  6. Pour into mold.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap.
  8. Twenty four to 48 hours later, unmold.
  9. Wrap in plastic.
  10. Place in sealed plastic bag.
  11. Use as needed to make your hand molded cold process soap!
Posted on

Sorcery Soap Dough Molding Soaps

Sorcery Soap Dough Molding Soap

There is much to learn from soap, every day, every batch and every new project.

The consistency of soap dough is important.

When I make soap to mold with fragrance oils, I can see how the fragrance oil reacts to my recipe. Some times it appears more transparent, stickier or has an odd consistency.

Some soap is ultra smooth, and those, generally, do not have fragrance in them. Do not misunderstand, this is not desire to discount fragrance oils. Of all people, I’m not that woman. I love fragrance oils.

Buy Sorcery Soap Dough

Sorcery Soap Apron and Soap Dough

To be clear, I am saying that I can see more deeply how the fragrance oils behave when squishing, mashing, and squeezing soap through my fingers, inasmuch as a baker can feel her bread dough. Some molding soaps have more resiliency or can be stretched and pulled, just like dough, where as others, it is simply too sticky to preform in the same way.

I see more about each batch by examining the soap in this way, than I did by just making bars and using them.

What I’m looking for: 

I want to see a dough that is pliable, and doesn’t cause cracks. A soap dough that is wet enough to mush and mash, but not so much so that I have to use a lot of corn starch to avoid sticking. Too much corn starch can cause white spots of pocket corn starch.

See this video for more help:

Most of my molding soap no longer has scent added to it and each batch it better than the last.

If you have questions, please email me at bee@sorcerysoap.com

I’m more than happy to try and help!

See our Cultivated Silk, Custom Fondant Kits and Cookies Cutters at: Sorcery Products™

All our products ship within 12 hours (weekend not included) and arrive in days.

Posted on

Sorcery Soap Dough Molding Soap

http://sorcerysoap.com/sorcery-soap-dough-molding-soap/

Learning from soap seems to be never ending. 

When I make soap to mold with fragrance oils, I can see how the fragrance oil reacts to my recipe. Some times it appears more transparent, stickier or has an odd consistency.

Some soap is ultra smooth, and those, generally, do not have fragrance in them. Do not misunderstand, this is not desire to discount fragrance oils. Of all people, I’m not that woman. I love fragrance oils.

Sorcery Soap Apron and Soap Dough

To be clear, I am saying that I can see more deeply how the fragrance oils behave when squishing, mashing, and squeezing soap through my fingers, inasmuch as a baker can feel her bread dough. Some molding soaps have more resiliency or can be stretched and pulled, just like dough, where as others, it is simply too sticky to preform in the same way.

I see more about each batch by examining the soap in this way, than I did by just making bars and using them.

What I’m looking for: 

I want to see a dough that is pliable, and doesn’t cause cracks. A soap dough that is wet enough to mush and mash, but not so much so that I have to use a lot of corn starch to avoid sticking. Too much corn starch can cause white spots of pocket corn starch.

See this video for more help:

Most of my molding soap no longer has scent added to it and each batch it better than the last.

If you have questions, please email me at bee@sorceryproducts.com

I’m more than happy to try and help!

See our Amazon Store at: Sorcery Products™

 

Posted on

Quick Soap Molding Tips

Sorcery Saop Dragon Silk

Quick Soap Molding Tips

Dragon Silk

Recently someone wrote to me asking how to stop soap from sticking in a cookie cutter.

That is a great question.

For this situation we will employ magic. Not ancient magic, like our ancestors, but common mis-understood magic. The magic I am referring to is tenacity.

Tenacity is tricky, but to say that we overcome hitches in our giddiy-ups without it is to underestimate the power of tenacity. Staying with anything, even when it gets sticky (ah…) is to see doors that were not previously seen, let-alone, understood. These doorways open up to new worlds of imagination and creativity.

No matter the level of tenacity, some quick tips are always helpful.

Don’t over complicate this process.

1.) Use a reliable and predictable soap recipe and cover it with plastic. Air exposure will harden soap. To keep it pliable seal the soap against air exposure.

2.) Cornstarch dusting is helpful to avoid soap sticking.

3.) Soap can be touched with bare hands after 24-48 hours of full saponification. Zap-test or pH test soap if you are unsure.

4.) Let your imagination out of the box and start creating!

Simple Soap Recipe
Author: Bhakti Iyata
Recipe type: Cold Process Soap
A simple soap recipe for your rotation, to build on, or a good go-to. An ideal soap recipe for cold process hand molding soap.
Ingredients
  • Lard – 50%
  • Coconut Oil – 30%
  • Olive Oil – 20%
  • *Olive oil can be substituted with soybean oil.
Instructions
  1. Melt the lard and coconut oil in microwave or double boiler to incorporate these ingredients.
  2. Add your liquid soybean oil (or other liquid oil) to the heated mixture. This will help cool the oils.
  3. Add lye water to your oils, not the other way around (please read about how to handle lye).
  4. Stick blend your oils and lye until trace.
  5. Add colorants.
  6. Pour into mold.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap.
  8. Twenty four to 48 hours later, unmold.
  9. Wrap in plastic.
  10. Place in sealed plastic bag.
  11. Use as needed to make your hand molded cold process soap!

 

Posted on

Soap Molding Consistency

This video shows the consistency of a pliable soap for soap molding. Make hand molded soap, use fondant tools or push this soap into a mold.

Let this soap cure and it will produce embeds that do not ash.

Please, ask me if you have questions. I’ll do my best to answer you quickly.

You can find me on any social media, I prefer contacting me through Facebook or email. soapwitch(at)sorcerysoap.com

Visit this page for a simple soap recipe .

Soap Molding Consistency

Posted on

Soap Stones How-To and Video

Soap Stones

How To Make Soap Stones

In this video there are two different colored soaps: one is colored with cocoa powder and the other is colored with Mad Oils Gold mica.

Soap Stones

Both of these soaps  are cold process. The brown soap has a 34% water discount, whereas the gold has a 38% water discount. The brown is much smoother and less sticky, while the gold is a bit stickier. For these soaps stones both are fine, and the stickier gold soap is harder to work with, but effective for adherence.

Taking about equal parts of both colors and blending them together helps to create an appearance of stone. I use these little rocks for Koi Pond Soaps. I’m not trying to create a realistic stone, but one that conveys the idea of a stone. Purple Koi Soap

The other interesting appearance is the gold with the full water recipe contrasts against the solid opaque nature of the brown giving a gleam, or a slight translucence effect. This effect is difficult to see in the video.

Don’t worry about making them perfect, this is one time that having your soap look a little rough is to your advantage. 🙂

I’m more than happy to help you, if you have any questions. I have recipes here, that are wonderful for soap molding, more videos and how-to’s.

*In the video I’m spraying with 91% alcohol to smooth and dry the soap stones.

Email me at:


Posted on

Tiny Soap Flowers

How to Make Tiny Soap Flowers

A video and instructions for making tiny soap flowers, from Sorcery Soap.

*For more information about soap molding, see: Resources.  For simple recipes see this simple soap recipe.

Fondant Plunger Used

To make molded soap flowers, it is a good idea to use a soap recipe that produces a smooth soap. I have posted some easy to use soap recipes for this purpose.

Ingredients for Simple Soap Recipe for Soap Molding

  • Lard – 50%
  • Coconut Oil – 30%
  • Soybean Oil – 20%
  • *Soybean oil can be substituted with castor oil or olive oil.

In the video the color has been adjusted, as the warm lights made all things orange, but in adjusting the color all the color of the yellow soap dough has been eliminated.  It is a bright yellow color.

The “flour” used for dusting is cornstarch, in a muslin bag. More corn starch would generally be used, for example, when making cookies, however, with soap its ideal to avoid over use, as it dries soap and could produce cracks. So, the soap appears to be a bit sticky, however, produces a much nice result.

Posted on

Make Your Own Embeds

Horse Sorcery Soap

Make Your Own EmbedsNovel Soaps

It is necessary to run risks. We only properly understand the miracle of life when we allow the unexpected to happen. ~ Paulo Coelho “Life: Selected Quotations”

If you want to break out of molds, try your hand (pun intended) at hand molding!

There are many molds on the market for embeds and after a trying many of them, I wanted a larger creative palate.

On one of my many cold process soap failures, I began molding some of that batch. I squished it, mushed it and felt its full textured as it warmed in my hands.

I learned a great deal from touching soap. (If you’re familiar with cold process I shouldn’t have to say this, but… Wait at least 24 hours to work with newly made cold process without gloves. Read Kevin Dunn’s book, Scientific Soapmaking: The Chemistry of the Cold Process on a scientific explanation of saponification.)

All of my embeds and tops are made with cold process. Use your favorite cold process recipe to begin and just pour off a cup to start. I’ve cultivated a particular recipe for soap and its reliable and consistent and of course, top secret.

I generally use my normal hard bar soap base for embeds, but I will make a total batch just for molding, when I need a particular color. This soap is made with a touch of silk which I find helps the smoothness of the embed batch. That’s the only hint I’ll give for now, but if you read my blog you’ll have read many secrets.

The best tool you have, beside your hands, is research, curiosity. Search this site for videos, more blog posts about soap molding, etc. To look for a “how-to” and have someone tell you every detail about how this works, you’ll lose the plot. This is a path of creativity, even if you make what you wanted, it is not the end. Its just the beginning. Its the possibility of seeing the world differently, with a touch more magic.