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Boundless Limitations

Sorcery Soap Embeds

I’ve been asked why I don’t use silicone molds. This question is curious to me.

I make all embeds by hand, using tools at times, but mostly molding by hand. I sometimes cannot duplicate, often times I can, but not exactly the identical as the first – often times better. This is why sculptors use molds as well. Sculptors carve the original in clay and mold, through a process, into bronze or the desired metal. Some use a lost wax casting method, where the original is lost, but a silicone mold is made before the loss in order to duplicate.

I do not.

I trust in my boundless creativity. I also know that once my fingers and mind have found the path they will, both, remember forever that path. Because I discovered it, I was not taught.  It was not someone else’s path, but uniquely mine.

When one discovers a path, in the woods or in the creative ethers, it is etched onto that person. This might not be true for all, but it most certainly is for me. It has been that way in all my endeavors. How does one put that on a resume? And, it is a most valuable resource.

When I had my construction company I mentally tracked all goings on and as a way of teaching my replacement, I wrote things down, had systems in place and written handbooks. It still took months to teach someone all that I stored in my mind and being. There was a rhythm, a music in my office that showed me my way every day because the events, the actions that were necessary to keep that business moving forward changed daily, therefore I had to adjust and still not lose the melody. That was the nature of the original question presented, how do I show someone that music? How do I teach someone to feel their own music and apply it to given circumstances?

It seems I’m doing something similar with Sorcery Soap. There is a music in this creative world, one that the seasons or the weather tells me as much as the 4-6 weeks curing time tells me. Once soap is cured, that dictates the next series of events: taking of photos, labeling, adding to the website, wrapping soap, writing ad copy… Eventually shipping. This is the most simple example.

How do you know when to order more soap supplies? When I weight things out this last time it seems I have run completely out of my one ingredient I use most… Shea Butter. When I order by “feel” I have yet to run out. Curious.

Like any good musician who knows their music without seeing the page an artist who knows when to create, what to do next and how to execute that action, soap making has its own music.

If anyone ever does end up working with me, there is a time to go for a hike and a time for a run, a time to sit quietly and muse and a time for much activity. These daily events are as important as molding embeds for a soap that hasn’t fully formed in the mind.

This is the music of my day.

 

 

 

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Quick Tips for Soap Molding

Sorcery Soap Pink Grapefruit - Forbidden Fruit

Moldable Soap

Recently someone wrote to me asking how to stop soap from sticking in a cookie cutter.Sorcery Soap Pink Grapefruit - Forbidden Fruit

That is a great question. More questions answered about Soap Dough and the process in “An Enchanted Book of Peculiar Ideas and Soap Potions” . Read it today!

For this situation we will employ magic. Not ancient magic, like our ancestors, but common mis-understood magic. The magic I am referring to is tenacity.

Tenacity is tricky, but to say that we overcome hitches in our giddiy-ups without it is to underestimate the power of tenacity. Staying with anything, even when it gets sticky (ah…) is to see doors that were not previously seen, let-alone, understood. These doorways open up to new worlds of imagination and creativity.

No matter the level of tenacity, some quick tips are always helpful.

Don’t over complicate this process.

1.) Use a reliable and predictable soap recipe and cover it with plastic. Air exposure will harden soap. To keep it pliable seal the soap against air exposure.

2.) Cornstarch dusting is helpful to avoid soap sticking.

3.) Soap can be touched with bare hands after 24-48 hours of full saponification. Zap-test or pH test soap if you are unsure.

4.) Let your imagination out of the box and start creating!

Simple Soap Recipe

Author: Bee Iyata
Recipe type: Cold Process Soap Dough 
A simple soap recipe for your rotation, to build on, or a good go-to. An ideal soap recipe for cold process hand molding soap.
Ingredients
  • Lard – 50%
  • Coconut Oil – 30%
  • Olive Oil – 20%
  • *Olive oil can be substituted with soybean oil.
Instructions – Follow your own safe handling of Sodium Hydroxide.
  1. Melt the lard and coconut oil in microwave or double boiler to incorporate these ingredients.
  2. Add your liquid soybean oil (or other liquid oil) to the heated mixture. This will help cool the oils.
  3. Add lye water to your oils, not the other way around (please read lye safety section in “An Enchanted Book of Peculiar Ideas and Soap Potions” on how to handle lye).
  4. Stick blend your oils and lye until trace.
  5. Add colorants.
  6. Pour into mold.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap.
  8. Twenty four to 48 hours later, unmold.
  9. Wrap in plastic.
  10. Place in sealed plastic bag.
  11. Use as needed to make your hand molded cold process soap!
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Tiny Soap Flowers

How to Make Tiny Soap Flowers

A video and instructions for making tiny soap flowers, from Sorcery Soap.

*For more information about soap molding, see: Resources.  For simple recipes see this simple soap recipe.

Fondant Plunger Used

To make molded soap flowers, it is a good idea to use a soap recipe that produces a smooth soap. I have posted some easy to use soap recipes for this purpose.

Ingredients for Simple Soap Recipe for Soap Molding

  • Lard – 50%
  • Coconut Oil – 30%
  • Soybean Oil – 20%
  • *Soybean oil can be substituted with castor oil or olive oil.

In the video the color has been adjusted, as the warm lights made all things orange, but in adjusting the color all the color of the yellow soap dough has been eliminated.  It is a bright yellow color.

The “flour” used for dusting is cornstarch, in a muslin bag. More corn starch would generally be used, for example, when making cookies, however, with soap its ideal to avoid over use, as it dries soap and could produce cracks. So, the soap appears to be a bit sticky, however, produces a much nice result.